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The  Ministry  of  Planning  and  Investment,  through  the  Lao  Statistics  Bureau,  conducted  the  Lao Population and Housing census in 2015.  This census is the fourth in a series of periodic censuses being undertaken in this country every 10 years starting from 1985.    The data collection for this census took place on 1-7 March 2015.  Funding for the  Census comes mainly from the Lao Government with support from the Chinese Government as well as from international organizations which include the United Nations Population Fund (UNFPA), Swiss Agency for Development and Cooperation (SDC), World Bank (WB), and United Nations Children’s Fund (UNICEF) .

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The Population Situation Analysis (PSA) presented in this document is representative of UNFPA’s commitment to mainstream population dynamics, reproductive health and gender issues into the Country Programme and national development strategies and plans.

 

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FPSA was conducted to assess the current situation of family planning, its determining and influencing factors and to develop an evidence base to inform UNFPA's support.

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This report in particular is to ensure that the 8th NSEDP could address population dynamics, taking into account the changes of population that needs to be considered in the 5-year period in order to achieve socio-economic goals.

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This  AYSA report focuses on young people aged 10-24 years.

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The State of the World’s Midwifery (SoWMy) produced by UNFPA, the International Confederation of Midwives (ICM), the World Health Organization (WHO) and several other partners, shows the progress and trends that have taken place since the inaugural 2011 edition, and also identifies the barriers and challenges to future progress. The report focuses on the urgent need to improve the availability, accessibility, acceptability and quality of midwifery services. 

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Young people matter. They matter because they have inherent human rights that must be upheld. They matter because an unprecedented 1.8 billion youth are alive today, and because they are the shapers and leaders of our global future. Yet in a world of adult concerns, young people are often overlooked. This tendency cries out for urgent correction, because it imperils youth as well as economies and societies at large.

In some countries, the growth of the youth population is outpacing the growth of the economy and outstripping the capacities of institutions charged with providing them basic services. Will schools and universities be able to meet the demand for education? Some 120 million young people reach working age every year. Will there be enough jobs to accommodate their need for decent work and a good income? Are health services strong enough? Will the young, including adolescents, have the information and services they need to avoid early, unintended and life-changing parenthood? Will the next generation be able to realize its full potential?

The State of World Population 2014, released by UNFPA, the United Nations Population Fund, looks at these and other questions to show how young people are key to economic and social progress in developing countries, and describes what must be done to realize their full potential. 

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Every day in developing countries, 20,000 girls below age 18 give birth. Nine in 10 of these births occur within marriage or a union. This has consequences on the health, education, employment and rights of an untold millions of girls. What are the challenges of adolescent pregnancy, and what can we do to ensure girls have a healthy and safe transition into adulthood? 

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LSIS is a household-based survey that applied the technical frameworks of the Multiple Indicator Cluster Survey (MICS) and Demographic and Health Survey (DHS). It is the first of its kind in Lao PDR. The LSIS was conducted to collect baseline data for the 7th National Social Economic Development Plan (NSEDP) and continued monitoring of progress towards the MDGs. LSIS provides up-to-date information on the social situation of children, women and men covering health, nutrition, education, water and sanitation, marriage and sexual activity, fertility and mortality, contraception, HIV/AIDS, child protection, and use of mass media and information technology.  

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All human beings—regardless of age, sex, race or income—are equal in dignity and rights. Yet 222 million women in developing countries are unable to exercise the human right to voluntary family planning.

This flagship report analyzes data and trends to understand who is denied access and why. It examines challenges in expanding access to family planning. And it considers the social and economic impact of family planning as well as the costs and savings of making it available to everyone who needs it.

The report asserts that governments, civil society, health providers and communities have the responsibility to protect the right to family planning for women across the spectrum, including those who are young or unmarried.

Nevertheless, the report finds that financial resources for family planning have declined and contraceptive use has remained mostly steady. In 2010, donor countries fell $500 million short of their expected contribution to sexual and reproductive health services in developing countries. Contraceptive prevalence has increased globally by just 0.1 per cent per year over the last few years.

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